Five June Tent Talks at the Salem Witch Trials Memorial

Announcing Five Fascinating 15-Minute “Tent” Talks Drawing on the Lessons of the Salem Witch Trials

Thursdays in June at noon

SALEM, MA — Since 2014 the Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice has organized free 15-minute “Tent” Talks at noon in the Salem Witch Trials Memorial off Charter Street.

These approachable and relevant presentations by notable members of the community offer opportunities for visitors and residents alike to take a mid-day break for reflection and engagement.

Please see complete schedule of June speakers below.

June 1:           Dr. Alexandra Piñeros Shields, Executive Director, Essex County Community Organization, Why Sanctuary Matters

June 8:           Hon. Kim Driscoll, Mayor of Salem, Salem: Looking Back, Moving Forward

June 15:         Stacy Tilney, Director of Communications, Salem Witch Museum, The Relevance of the Salem Witch Trials in This Age of Conflict

June 22:         Hon. Paul Tucker, State Rep. 7th Essex District, How is the Commonwealth of Mass. Protecting Human Rights?

June 29:         Rev. Joseph M. Amico, M.Div., Pastor, Tabernacle Congregational Church, The Changing Role of the Church in Society

Update: John Legend Event Rescheduled to May 2 (formerly March 30)

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the Salem State Series event featuring award-winning singer-songwriter John Legend has been rescheduled for May 2, 2017. The initial date was March 30. All tickets purchased remain valid and may be used for entry.

The May 2 event will take place at 7:30 pm in Salem State University’s Rockett Arena.  Questions or concerns should be directed to the Series box office at 978.542.7555 or seriestickets@salemstate.edu on weekdays between 10 am-4 pm.

At the May 2 event, Legend will perform some of his hit songs in addition to discussing his initiative, the Show Me Campaign, which focuses on education as a key to breaking the cycle of poverty, and the #FREEAMERICA campaign, which is aimed at ending the school-to-prison pipeline. At the event, Legend will receive the inaugural Salem Advocate for Social Justice award from The Salem Award Foundation.

Tickets may be purchased through the Series website at salemstate.edu/series or by calling 978.542.7555.

The Series, presented under the auspices of the Salem State University Foundation, is pleased to announce that Denorabilia, LLC is the presenting sponsor for this event. A full list of sponsors can be found at salemstate.edu/series.

Award-winning Singer-Songwriter John Legend to Headline Salem State Series, Receive Salem Advocate for Social Justice Award

Legend will perform some of his hit songs and speak about his social justice work.

legend_squareSALEM, MA, November 4, 2016 — Award-winning singer-songwriter John Legend will headline Salem State University’s long-running and popular speaker series on March 30, 2017. At the event, Legend will receive the inaugural Salem Advocate for Social Justice award from The Salem Award Foundation for his work to make a difference in the lives of others. Legend will perform some of his hit songs in addition to discussing his initiative, the Show Me Campaign (ShowMeCampaign.org), which focuses on education as a key to breaking the cycle of poverty.

The March 30, 2017 event will be held at 7:30 pm at Salem State University’s Rocket Arena. Tickets will go on sale Tuesday, November 15 at 10 am at salemstate.edu/series or by calling 978.542.7555.

Legend is a multi-award winning sing-songwriter whose work has garnered him 19 Grammy Awards, an Academy Award, A Golden Globe Award, and a BET Award for Best New Artist, among others. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, Legend recently won his first Golden Globe Award, a Grammy award, and a Critic’s Choice Award for his song “Glory,” which he wrote and performed with Common for the film Selma.

Legend has worked throughout his career to make a difference in the lives of others. He launched the Show Me Campaign in 2007 and has received numerous awards for his leadership, including the 2010 BET Humanitarian of the Year award, the 2009 CARE Humanitarian Award for Global Change, the 2009 Bishop John T. Walker Distinguished Humanitarian Service Award from Africare, and the 2011 Harvard Foundation Artist of the Year Award. In 2015, Legend initiated the #freeAmerica campaign, designed to change the national conversation to make change in America’s criminal justice system.

Based on his extensive efforts to make a difference in the lives of others, Legend will be the inaugural recipient of the Salem Advocate for Social Justice award, presented by The Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice. When possible, this recognition is presented in collaboration with Salem State University at the Salem State Series. The award recognizes luminaries in their fields who use their platforms to champion social justice issues and advocate for the underrepresented populations. Recipients embrace the Salem Award Foundation’s mission to promote awareness, understanding and empathy in support of human rights and social justice.

Starting Tuesday, November 15 at 10 am, tickets to the spring 2017 Salem State Series may be purchased through the Series website at salemstate.edu/series or by calling 978.542.7555. Price categories are as follows:

• Premium $100 (Entered to win VIP dinner and photo with speaker)
• Reserved $60
• General Admission $25
• Salem State Student $10 (limited to the first 200)

The Salem State Series is presented by the Salem State Foundation which was incorporated in 1977 as a 501(c) (3) private, not-for-profit organization. Its mission is to help Salem State achieve its mission and goals by raising, investing and distributing private contributions for the benefit of the university. In so doing, the Foundation provides the opportunity to meet the needs of the Salem State community not met through public funding.

The Series, presented under the auspices of the Salem State University Foundation, is pleased to announce that Denorabilia, LLC is the presenting sponsor for this event. A full list of sponsors can be found at salemstate.edu/series.

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About Salem State University
Salem State University, established in 1854, is a comprehensive, public institution of higher learning located approximately 15 miles north of Boston, Massachusetts. The university enrolls about 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students representing 44 states and 81 nations, and is one of the largest state universities in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. With over 250 veterans currently enrolled, Salem State has been designated a military-friendly institution by G.I. Jobs, placing it in the top 20 percent of schools nationwide.

About the Salem Award Foundation
Since its founding in 1992, it has been the mission of the Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice to ensure that the lessons of the 1692 Witch Trials are not forgotten. In addition to publicly recognizing individuals or organizations working to help those who suffer discrimination and injustice through its annual awards, the Salem Award Foundation supports the Salem Witch Trial Memorial, a public monument honoring those who died in 1692, and offers educational programming that broadens the community’s awareness and understanding of current issues of human rights and social justice. For more information, please go to: www.salemaward.org.

Elie Wiesel Dies at 87

Elie Wiesel high res
Elie Wiesel, 1928 – 2016

 

The Salem Award Foundation mourns the loss of Holocaust survivor, Nobel laureate and person of integrity Elie Wiesel. His message against hatred and intolerance in all its forms will be remembered for generations to come.

We were honored deeply by Mr. Wiesel’s presence at the Salem Witch Trials Memorial dedication on August 5, 1992.

Read the New York Times article.

June Tent Talks Series in Salem

Salem, MA–The Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice invites you to hear a series of brief presentations during the month of June beneath a tent on the grounds of the Salem Witch Trials Memorial.
These free 15-minute talks, held under a pop-up tent at the Salem Witch Trials Memorial, bring visibility to the issues of human rights and social justice in contemporary society.  We are pleased and honored to have Professor Tad Baker give the first Tent Talk of 2016.
All talks are on Thursdays at noon. Rain or shine.

The schedule is as follows:

June 2nd
Confirming Proctor’s Ledge: the Site of the 1692 Executions
Tad Baker, Professor of History, Salem State University
June 9th
On Being a Person of Color: Do You See Me Now?
Rosario Ubiera-Minaya, Chief Program Officer
North Shore Community Development Coalition
June 16th
Creating Positive Impact through Inclusion
Margarita Ruiz, Superintendent of Schools, Salem, MA
June 23rd
The Challenge of Keeping the Peace in 2016
Mary Butler, Chief of Police, Salem, MA
June 30th
Intolerance in Pre-Revolutionary War Salem
Jim McAllister, Local Historian
For directions to the Salem Witch Trials Memorial and more information about these and other events sponsored by the Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice, please go to: Salemaward.org

Anne Driscoll, Human Rights Activist, Receives 2016 Salem Award

SALEM, MA — Long-time Swampscott resident Anne Driscoll is being honored for her contributions to the wrongful conviction effort. In the universe of human rights and social justice, one of the least served populations is the thousands and thousands of prisoners around the world who have been wrongfully convicted of crimes they did not commit.

Driscoll will receive the Salem Award at a ceremony on Sunday, March 20, 2016, at The Bridge at 211 in Salem, MA. At that time, Jhonel Roberts, Senior, Salem High School and Evan Aroko, Senior, Salem Academy Charter School will receive Rising Leader awards. A public reception at 3:00 pm and the awards ceremony at 4:00 pm will be held at The Bridge at 211 (thebridge211.org). The Bridge at 211 is entered at 20-28 Federal Street. A cocktail reception will be held at 5:30 pm at the nearby Turner’s Seafood Restaurant at 43 Church Street, Salem.

The mission of the Salem Award Foundation (SAF) is to keep alive the lessons of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 and to make known and honor the heroic work of those who speak out and take action to alleviate discrimination, promote tolerance, and achieve justice for contemporary victims of social injustice. The SAF is an all-volunteer organization almost 100% dependent on individual contributions.To learn more about this event and the work of the Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice, please go to: www.salemaward.org

Read the Salem News article.

Human Rights Activist Anne Driscoll Working on Innocence Project in Ireland to Receive Salem Award

Long-time Swampscott resident Anne Driscoll is being honored for her contributions to the wrongful conviction effort. In the universe of human rights and social justice, one of the least served populations are the thousands and thousands of prisoners around the world who have been wrongfully convicted of crimes they did not commit.

Driscoll will be given the Salem Award at a ceremony on Sunday, March 20, 2016 at the Bridge at 211 in Salem, MA. At that time, two yet to be named high school students will be bestowed with the Rising Leader award. A public reception at 3:00 pm and the awards ceremony at 4:00 pm will be held at the Bridge at 211 (thebridge211.org). The Bridge at 211 is entered at 20-28 Federal Street. A private reception will be held at 5:30 pm at the nearby Turner’s Seafood Restaurant at 43 Church Street, Salem.

The mission of the Salem Award Foundation (SAF) is to keep alive the lessons of the Salem Witch Trials of 1692 and to make known and honor the heroic work of those who speak out and take action to alleviate discrimination, promote tolerance, and achieve justice for contemporary victims of social injustice. The SAF is an all-volunteer organization almost 100% dependent on individual contributions. To learn more about this event and the work of the Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice, please go to: www.salemaward.org

Background on Anne Driscoll
Anne Driscoll has been working to overturn wrongful convictions since 2006. That year, the trained/licensed social worker and working journalist joined the Justice Brandeis Project at Brandeis University. She would dedicate nearly a decade working to free Angel Echavarria of Lynn who was serving a life sentence for a 1994 murder he did not commit.

In 2013, Ms. Driscoll was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship and moved to the Irish Innocence Project (IIP) at Griffith College that was started by attorney David Langwallner in 2009. Driscoll was not a lawyer, but she was a seasoned investigative journalist with a social service and family court background. The former had particular significance.

Ms. Driscoll relocated to Dublin in September and implemented the “radical” curriculum she had outlined in her Fulbright application. She personally taught investigative journalism techniques to law and journalism students who were also volunteer case workers in the IIP at Griffith College, and oversaw program activities.

With her arrival, the IIP at Griffith College became only the second of the 68 certified innocence projects worldwide to train their volunteers as investigators. Driscoll drew on her own personal experiences working for People magazine and as a “reporter” in the Justice Brandeis project when instructing student volunteers how to dig for the evidence project lawyers would need to prove the innocence of a wrongfully convicted “client.” By their very nature, Innocence Projects are very unpopular with judicial, law enforcement, and sometimes other government agencies. Investigators carry out their work while risking personal peril.

Anne brought to fruition the ongoing effort by the Irish Innocence Project to exonerate the name of Irish citizen Harry Gleeson, wrongfully convicted and hanged for murder 72 years ago. Plans are in the works to make a major motion picture about the Gleeson case.

Drawing on her communications and media background (The Boston Globe, People magazine), Anne publicized the work of the Irish Innocence Project, the Justice Brandeis Law Project and the issue of wrongful convictions worldwide through numerous appearances on television and radio; extensive coverage in traditional print media; and Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, websites, etc. Her work to publicize Angel Echavarria’s exoneration resulted in more than 200 articles in one day. As a result of her own social service training and experience, Anne imbued her volunteers with an understanding of, and respect for, the emotional trauma that impacts wrongful conviction victims and their loved ones.

2016 Bronze Sponsor of the
Salem Award Ceremony
Cabot-Logo-Color

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Site of Salem Witch Trial Hangings Confirmed

Salem, Mass.– After nearly 325 years of research and speculation, the site where 19 innocent people were hanged during the 1692 Salem Witch Trials has been verified. Proctor’s Ledge, an area bounded by Proctor and Pope Streets in Salem, Massachusetts, has been confirmed as the execution site by a team of scholars. The SAF has been proud to be a part of the research team.

     The Gallows Hill Project team bases its findings on the early 20th century research of historian Sidney Perley, an eye-witness reference to an execution from the trial papers, maps from different periods, and newer technology not available previously. “Ground-penetrating radar and high-tech aerial photography shed new light on the topography of the site as it is today and as it was in 1692,” asserted Professor Benjamin Ray of the University of Virginia. “As a result,” added Ray, “we can now say with confidence that Proctor’s Ledge is the site of the hangings.”

     Members of the Gallows Hill Project Team include Emerson “Tad” Baker, Professor of History, Salem State University; Shelby Hypes, Chair, Salem Award Foundation; Elizabeth Peterson, Director, the city of Salem’s Corwin House (The Witch House); Tom Phillips, producer and director of Salem Witch Trials: Examine the Evidence; Benjamin Ray, Professor of Religion, University of Virginia; Marilynne Roach, Salem witch trials historian and author; and Peter Sablock, Emeritus Professor of Geology, Salem State University.

October Tent Talks Schedule

SAF_TT_October2015_poster_web
The Salem Award Foundation for Human Rights and Social Justice invites you to hear a series of brief presentations during the month of October beneath a tent on the grounds of the Salem Witch Trials Memorial. These 15-minute talks bring visibility to the issues of human rights and social justice in contemporary society.

All talks are on Thursdays at noon. Rain or shine.

October 1st
Working to Unify Diverse Communities
Mickey Northcutt, CEO, North Shore Community Development Corporation

October 8th
What It Means to Be a Site of Conscience
Braden Paynter, Program Associate, International Sites of Conscience

October 15th
On Being a City of Inclusion
Kim Driscoll, Mayor, City of Salem

October 22nd
America’s Border Crisis: How Immigration Became Illegal
Avi Chomsky, Professor of History, SSU

October 29th
What It Means to Be a Descendant
John Keenan, Vice President, SSU

Made possible in part by
eastern_bank_foundation_logo

 

 

June Tent Talks on SATV and Online

Every Thursday in June at noon, the SAF presented a speaker on a contemporary issue relating to human rights and social justice at the Salem Witch Trials Memorial. If you missed one or all of the talks, you are in luck. SATV recorded all four Tent Talks and has been airing them on Channel 3 at scheduled times.

If you prefer to watch at your own pace, you may visit the web link below, and select an option to “Watch Now” and view the program via online streaming.

http://cc.satvonline.org/Cablecast/Public/Show.aspx?ChannelID=2&ShowID=8587

Thanks to all who attended and participated in June Tent Talks series at the Witch Trials Memorial. We have planned another series of speakers for this coming October on Thursdays at noon.